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story of Reo Joe work, kin, and community in Autotown, U.S.A. by Lisa M. Fine

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Published by Temple University Press in Philadelphia, PA .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • Michigan,
  • Lansing.

Subjects:

  • Reo Motor Car Company -- Employees -- History.,
  • Automobile industry workers -- Michigan -- Lansing.,
  • Lansing (Mich.) -- Social life and customs.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references (p. 187-231) and index.

StatementLisa M. Fine.
SeriesCritical perspectives on the past
Classifications
LC ClassificationsHD8039.A82 U6437 2004
The Physical Object
Paginationxii, 239 p. :
Number of Pages239
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL3693288M
ISBN 10159213257X, 1592132588
LC Control Number2003067202

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  In this Book. The Reo Motor Car Company operated in Lansing, Michigan, for seventy years, and encouraged its thousands of workers to think of themselves as part of a factory family. Reo workers, most typically white, rural, native-born Protestant men, were dubbed Reo Joes. These ordinary fellows had ordinary aspirations: job security, decent working conditions, and sufficient pay to support a : Lisa Fine. Pay attention to names, capitalization, and dates. × Close Overlay. Book Info. Story Of Reo Joe. Book Description: The Reo Motor Car Company operated in Lansing, Michigan, for seventy years, and encouraged its thousands of workers to think of themselves as part of a factory family. Reo workers, most typically white, rural, native-born Protestant men, were dubbed Reo Joes.   Lisa M. Fine tells the Reo story from the workers' perspective on the vast social, economic, and political changes that took place in the first three quarters of the twentieth century. Lisa Fine explores their understanding of the city where they lived, the industry that employed them, and the ideas about work, manhood, race, and family that shaped their identities/5(7). Lisa Fine explores their understanding of the city where they lived, the industry that employed them, and the ideas about work, manhood, race, and family that shaped their Story of Reo Joeis, then, a book about historical memory; it challenges us to reconsider what we think we know about corporate welfare, unionization, de-industrialization, and working-class leisure.

Lisa M. Fine, The Story of Reo Joe: Work, Kin and Community in Autotown, U.S.A.. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, xii + pp. $23 (paperback), ISBN: Reviewed for by Lawrence W. Boyd Jr., Center for Labor Education and Research, University of . In her book, The Story of Reo Joe, author Lisa Fine explores the experiences of Reo’s workforce and its lasting impact on the city. C-SPAN’s Local Content Vehicles (LCVs) made a stop in their “ Story Of Reo Joe: Work, Kin, And Community: Fine, Lisa: Books - Skip to main Books Hello, Sign in. Account & Lists Account Returns & Orders. Try. Prime. Cart Hello Select your address Best Sellers Deals Store New Releases Gift Ideas Customer Service Electronics Home Books Author: Lisa Fine. A REO is mentioned in a humorous short story by James Thurber entitled, The Car We Had to Push. It tells the story of Thurber’s family car, which would only start if pushed a long way. After several odd adventures, the car is destroyed by a trolley car.

Featuring poetry, short stories and essays in Te Reo Māori and English, the journal includes work from some of Aotearoa’s most talented Māori writers. “We wanted to flip Western notions of publishing and writing on their head and discover what could be created if we used Kaupapa Māori as our structure and inspiration,” explains Anahera. in the story of reo joe work kin and community in autotown usa lisa m fine chronicles the birth life and death of the reo motor car company which began operations in and closed its doors in running parallel to that narrative is the more interesting and compelling story of reo joe the fictional paradigmatic employee of reo who did not adhere to commonly held views.   Winner of this year’s Wright Family Foundation/Te Kura Pounamu Award for Te Reo Māori in the New Zealand Book Awards for Children and . REO Speedwagon continued to score further hit albums ('s Good Trouble, 's Wheels Are Turnin') and singles ("Keep the Fire Burnin'," the number one hit power ballad "Can't Fight This Feeling," etc.), but the hits dried up shortly in , Life as We Know It managed to go gold, but their fans' sudden disinterest coupled with turmoil between certain bandmembers led to.